The Fan Hitch Volume 10, Number 3, June 2008

Journal of the Inuit Sled Dog International

In This Issue....

From the Editor: The Fan Hitch... Enhanced

F.I.D.O.: Andrew Maher and Julia Landry

Fan Mail

In the News

Out on the Ice: Three Days with ISDs in North Greenland

Two Friends, Fourteen Dogs…One Quest!

The Nunavut Quest’s 10th Anniversary Run


BAS Vignette: Lampwick Harnesses

Sledge Dog Memorial Fund Update

CAAT’s 2008 Northern Schedule

The Chinook Project Returns to Kimmirut

Product Review Update: Double Driver Sled

IMHO: On Feral Cats and Inuit Sled Dogs


Navigating This Site

Index of articles by subject

Index of back issues by volume number

Search The Fan Hitch


Articles to download and print

Ordering Ken MacRury's Thesis

Our comprehensive list of resources

Talk to The Fan Hitch

The Fan Hitch home page

ISDI home page


Editor's/Publisher's Statement
Editor-in-Chief: Sue Hamilton
Webmaster: Mark Hamilton
Print Edition: Imaged and distributed by the IPL students of the Ulluriaq School, Kangiqsualujjuaq, Nunavik
The Fan Hitch, Journal of the Inuit Sled Dog International, is published four times a year. It is available at no cost online at: http://thefanhitch.org.

Print subscriptions: in Canada $20.00, in USA $23.00, elsewhere $32.00 per year, postage included. All prices are in Canadian dollars. Make checks payable in Canadian dollars only to "Mark Brazeau", and send to Mark Brazeau, Box 151 Kangiqsualujjuaq QC J0M 1N0 Canada. (Back issues are also available. Contact Sue Hamilton.)


The Fan Hitch
welcomes your letters, stories, comments and suggestions. The editorial staff reserves the right to edit submissions used for publication.


Contents of The Fan Hitch are protected by international copyright laws. No photo, drawing or text may be reproduced in any form without written consent. Webmasters please note: written consent is necessary before linking this site to yours! Please forward requests to Sue Hamilton, 55 Town Line Rd., Harwinton, Connecticut  06791, USA or mail@thefanhitch.org


The Inuit Sled Dog International

The Inuit Sled Dog International (ISDI) is a consortium of enthusiasts whose goal is the preservation of this ancient arctic breed in its purest form as a working dog. The ISDI's efforts are concentrated on restoring the pure Inuit Dog to its native habitat. The ISDI's coordinators welcome to your comments and questions.

ISDI Coordinator Canada:
Geneviève Montcombroux, Box 206, Inwood, MB R0C 1P0; gmontcombroux@gmail.com
ISDI Coordinator USA:
Sue Hamilton, 55 Town Line Road, Harwinton, CT 06791, mail@thefanhitch.org

CAAT team members Isabelle and Annette induce anesthesia
by intravenous injection.                                       Photo: CAAT

 The Canadian Animal Assistance Team's

2008 Northern Wellness Clinics


The Canadian Animal Assistance Team (CAAT) will be traveling to three communities in Nunavut and one in Nunatsiavut (Newfoundland-Labrador), beginning this summer. Teams comprised of veterinarians, veterinary technicians, assistants and educator-assistants will be in Kugluktuk (Coppermine) from June 12-23, Mittimatalik (Pond Inlet) from July 9-17, Qamani'tuaq (Baker Lake) from August 20-September 1 and in Nain, Nunatsiavut from September 8-September 15. Participating team members come from the southern Canadian provinces and not only volunteer their time and expertise, but also pay a portion of the expenses for the privilege of serving these northern communities.

CAAT has been fundraising for donations of cash and Aeroplan frequent flyer points to help support their ambitious 2008 northern Canadian schedule. The host communities have been very actively involved in support of CAAT’s eagerly anticipated wellness clinics, too. Local residents have donated Aeroplan miles and have held bingo events to raise funds.

Hamlet residents have responded positively and enthusiastically to surveys that CAAT handed out during the planning stages of the wellness clinics. Based on this input, CAAT teams expect that their activities will focus on spaying, neutering, vaccinating, deworming, educating and whatever else needs to be accomplished for communities' dogs (and cats, too).

To learn more about CAAT and their work and how you can help, visit their primary website, and the Ontario Chapter site (the Ontario Chapter is responsible for Animal Wellness Projects in remote areas of Eastern Canada).









 

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