The Fan Hitch PostScript
Number 4, posted
December 2019
In this Post

From the Editor

Passage: William John ‘Qimmiliriji’ Carpenter


 QIA, Canadian Government Settlement


Media review: Red Serge and Polar Bear Pants


Media review: One Day in the Life of Noah Piugattuk

 
Update: A Book is Born



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              Editor: Sue Hamilton
              Webmaster: Mark Hamilton
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From the Editor…

It’s been one thing after another around here. I had been hoping to publish PostScript #4 by the end of September but, as Scotland’s national poet Rabbie Burns, once penned, “The best laid schemes o' mice an' men Gang aft a-gley.” So I issued myself a new deadline of shortly after our Thanksgiving (November 28th). Missed that one, too. But in the meantime lots of things, mostly good have happened and it wasn’t long before the #4 electronic file had ten articles! Four of these are research papers of no small importance. One of those, “Specialized sledge dogs accompanied Inuit dispersal across the North American Arctic” is especially huge and for non-scientists like me, something of a brain twister. One of that paper’s authors has generously offered to answer some of my questions about it and also contribute a lay version to help all of us understand the work, specifically about the Inuit Dog. Once again…the best laid schemes … and she won’t be able to do that until sometime after the new year. It’s importance is far too great to simply send you a link and wish you luck wading through it. And the numerous media outlet interpretations just gloss over some of the points and don’t begin to explore the depth of this ten year project. So, unlike King Solomon, I have whacked this baby in half and soon (I hope) to follow this issue of PostScript with number five which will contain all four research papers and anything else might pop up in the meantime.

As it is, this pint-size issue is both informative and sad. Bill ‘‘Qimmiliriji’ Carpenter recently passed away. His place in the history of the Canadian Inuit Dog must not be overlooked. Kim Han celebrated the birth of her book, The Canadian Inuit Dog: Icon of Canada’s North, garnering loads of coverage with public talks and a related soon-to-be published short story in a Canadian periodical with a smashing cover photo. The Canadian government has reached a settlement with the Qikiqtani Inuit Association over the traumatic events that took place between 1950 and 1975. You will also read two media reviews, both historical, one in print and the other a recent film.

So that’s it for number 4. Number 5 is mostly ready to go and I hope it will be available to you shortly into the new year……this assuming my best laid plans don’t once again Gang aft a-gley.

Wishing you all good things this holiday season and, as always,

Smooth ice and narrow leads.

                Sue and Mark