The Fan Hitch Volume 5, Number 2, March 2003

Official Newsletter of the Inuit Sled Dog International

Table of Contents

Editorial: The Blind Men and the Elephant
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The Return
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Dogs in Greenland
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The Contribution of Dogs to Exploration in Antarctica
*
Page from the Behaviour Notebook: Raising Raven
*
Antarctic Sketches
*
Physiology of Sledge Dogs
*
The Qitdlarssuaq Chronicles, Part 2
*
News Briefs:
Thesis update
Blue Eye update
Mailbag
*
Product Review: DirectStop®
*
Book Review: Carved from the Land
*
Tip for the Trail: Re-lining Water Jug Caps
*
IMHO: Preservation vs. Saving


Navigating This Site

Index of articles by subject

Index of back issues by volume number

Search The Fan Hitch


Articles to download and print

Ordering Ken MacRury's Thesis

Our comprehensive list of resources

Talk to The Fan Hitch

The Fan Hitch home page

ISDI home page


Editor's/Publisher's Statement
Editor-in-Chief: Sue Hamilton
Webmaster: Mark Hamilton
Print Edition: Imaged and distributed by the IPL students of the Ulluriaq School, Kangiqsualujjuaq, Nunavik
The Fan Hitch, Journal of the Inuit Sled Dog International, is published four times a year. It is available at no cost online at: http://thefanhitch.org.

Print subscriptions: in Canada $20.00, in USA $23.00, elsewhere $32.00 per year, postage included. All prices are in Canadian dollars. Make checks payable in Canadian dollars only to "Mark Brazeau", and send to Mark Brazeau, Box 151 Kangiqsualujjuaq QC J0M 1N0 Canada. (Back issues are also available. Contact Sue Hamilton.)


The Fan Hitch
welcomes your letters, stories, comments and suggestions. The editorial staff reserves the right to edit submissions used for publication.


Contents of The Fan Hitch are protected by international copyright laws. No photo, drawing or text may be reproduced in any form without written consent. Webmasters please note: written consent is necessary before linking this site to yours! Please forward requests to Sue Hamilton, 55 Town Line Rd., Harwinton, Connecticut  06791, USA or mail@thefanhitch.org


The Inuit Sled Dog International

The Inuit Sled Dog International (ISDI) is a consortium of enthusiasts whose goal is the preservation of this ancient arctic breed in its purest form as a working dog. The ISDI's efforts are concentrated on restoring the pure Inuit Dog to its native habitat. The ISDI's coordinators welcome to your comments and questions.

ISDI Coordinator Canada:
Geneviève Montcombroux, Box 206, Inwood, MB R0C 1P0; gmontcombroux@gmail.com
ISDI Coordinator USA:
Sue Hamilton, 55 Town Line Road, Harwinton, CT 06791, mail@thefanhitch.org

Antarctic Sketches 

by Mike Fielding

This is the second in a series of four excerpts taken from The Book That Wasn't, a limited edition publication of the very personal accounts of Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey and British Antarctic Survey veterans describing what it was like to live and work with dogs. Look for more of Mike Fielding's sketches adorning other articles in this issue of The Fan Hitch. The ISDI and The Fan Hitch gratefully acknowledge the kindness of Mike Fielding and Kevin Walton for granting permission to reproduce portions of The Book That Wasn't. Ed.


Chow , when pregnant, she was well looked after, having 
a kennel made from an old packing case so she could live 
like a lady of leisure.


Arch, one solid lump of muscle. Unfortunately he was ripped 
across the stomach in a fight on one of the field trips and 
had to be put down. A great loss of a character,
a great friend and a hard worker.


Gimli, a small and usually peaceful dog. 


Gareth of the Vikings team.

During his days at university, studying land surveying, Mike Fielding met lecturer Colin Brown who had been at the Stonington Island base in the late 1940s and had traveled with Sir Vivian Fuchs. And so Mike's antarctic passion was sparked. His polar service, 1967-1970, was equally divided between weeks to months carrying out land surveys by dog team and time at base where his principal job was looking after up to 120 dogs. "If we got fed up with the other humans on the base or in the tent then we usually went and sat and talked to the dogs. Very therapeutic." After is BAS service, Mike returned to the UK, married Pat and continued his career. They moved to Brunei and then Switzerland before returning home, then to Oman and then back home again. Mike's career still takes him afar for periods of time.

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